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MBA: One-Year

graduate-business-one-year-mba

For driven individuals who accept the challenge to make the most of their time — and get ahead faster, the John Cook School of Business launched the One-Year MBA, a full-time, intensive learning experience.


Attaining an MBA in One Year. That’s a Smart Move.

The One-Year MBA is aimed at prospective students worldwide who are grounded in business — either through a BSBA degree or significant work experience (two years, minimum) — and who are ready to spend an additional year honing their skills and advancing their careers.

The only program of its kind in the region, the One-Year MBA begins each summer and spans three terms — summer, fall and spring. Between the fall and spring semesters, students will study abroad for two weeks to gain valuable international business experience, which includes studying foreign-based business cases and attending guest lectures. For a sample of what the study abroad experience is like, please feel free to read Business Abroad: Hong Kong MBA Study Abroad Trip 2012.

 Curriculum Overview

The Cook School, with its continuing mission to provide excellence in business education has developed a program to help students develop strong ethical and technical skills. Combined with the expertise and dedication of our faculty, our One-Year MBA program prepares students for a rewarding experience giving them the tools necessary to create real and lasting change.

Program Overview

As a one of a kind opportunity, the One-Year MBA is a specialized program developed for students. The program allows students to get the most and maximize their potential throughout the year they are enrolled.

Sessions Overview

The One-Year MBA divides the year into three separate sessions.  The summer session (Red Semester) is an intense schedule, where the fundamentals of the MBA program are met.  The fall session (Yellow Semester) builds on the summer courses and also allows for students to take electives in the evenings.  The spring session (Green Semester) has fewer courses because students are focusing on career building skills and looking/interviewing for jobs.