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Learning Outcomes: EMIB

A well-designed assessment process: defines learning goals and objectives; aligns the curriculum with goals; identifies instruments and measures; collects and analyzes assessment data; disseminates assessment data; and uses data for continuous improvement.


Course Map

While exploring the outcomes below for the Master of International Business, executive format (EMIB) we encourage you to review the course map.


I. Background

The Learning Outcomes and Objectives

A well-designed assessment process asks the following questions.

In this plan, the five SLU learning outcomes are translated into learning objectives that are specifically tailored to fit the EMIB program. In addition, the plan includes suggested tasks on how and where we are going to assess these outcomes.

Masters of International Business, executive format (EMIB)

While the learning outcomes describe what we want our EMIB students to be, the specific learning objectives for each outcome describe what we want the EMIB students todo. In the following table, the learning outcomes and the corresponding specific learning objectives for the EMIB program are outlined.

 

Learning Outcome

Learning Objectives

Scholarship and Knowledge

  1. Students understand international business with an emphasis on cultural diversity, adaptation, and maintaining integrity in scholarship, instruction, and practice.
  2. Students evaluate the implications of international dimensions and their effects on day-to-day business operations and strategy.
  3. Students recognize the risks and opportunities that face multinational organizations in the global arena.

Intellectual Inquiry and Communication

  1. Students perform individual research on a question, issue, or problem and then able to relay their results to professors/classmates using appropriate exposition techniques.
  2. Students practice impartial evaluation of the merits and applicability of reports and/or articles in both academic and popular publications.
  3. Students apply theoretical concepts expressed in class to case studies and/or real life situations in their workplaces.

Community Building

  1. Students understand that multinational firms have a global responsibility of improving the various communities within which they operate
  2. Students understand the benefits of working in teams composed of people from various ethnic, educational, and work experience backgrounds.

Leadership and Service

  1. Second year students will serve as mentors for one or more incoming students.
  2. All students alternate leadership roles in small groups thereby requiring all students to practice group leadership skills.
  3. Students speak with and advise undergraduate international business majors.

Spirituality and Values

  1. Students understand the social responsibility aspect of doing international business.
  2. Students recognize the impact of their managerial choices on various environmental issues in different multinational contexts.
  3. Students understand that moral and ethical behavior will often differ from behavior that is merely legal.

 


II. EMIB Assessment Process & Measures

Unlike evaluation which focuses on the professor and the teaching performance, assessment focuses on the students and the learning environment. It involves measurement tools that evaluate whether students have learned each of the learning outcomes or not. The following section outlines the suggested direct measurement tools that will apply to assess learning outcomes of the EMIB program.

A. Direct Assessment Measurements of Student Learning Outcomes

 Course Embedded Direct Measurements and Rubrics

  1. Written assignments including cases, research reports, and memos.
  2. Oral presentations, debates.
  3. Computer projects
  4. Simulations
  5. Classroom exercises
  6. Business plans and/or consulting projects.
  7. Exams or embedded questions on exams.

 Rubrics

  1. 4-10 outcomes per degree program
  2. 2- 4 objectives for each outcome
  3. 1 or more measurements for each objective
  4. Faculty driven, mission driven

 IB faculty will choose several courses that are offered to EMIB students for  assessment. While one course might be the best assessment ground for the  scholarship and knowledge, another course will be a better fit for leadership and  service. IB faculty will choose several courses to assess all student learning  outcomes

Thesis

The final requirement in the EMIB program is a thesis. In the thesis, students should demonstrate a practical understanding of the various business tools, techniques and strategies that are applied in international business. The thesis is considered a direct measure of learning outcomes that are outlined in the above table because IB faculty mentoring students’ theses will be able to develop the students learning outcomes by giving individual feedback and suggestions that students need to incorporate in the thesis. Hence, closing the loop in observing what needs to be acquired by each student.

B. Indirect Assessment Measurements of Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Surveys
  2. Questionnaires
  3. Interviews
  4. Focus Groups

These measurement tools are part of the on-going EMIB program assessment, but  alone will not be sufficient to assess student learning outcomes. (See attached samples of these indirect assessment tools)

Executive Masters of International Business

 TABLE1. Assessment of Learning Objectives by Course

 

 

Int’L Bus. Environment

Int’l Bus. Strategy

Latin American Bus.

Int’l Negotiations

 

Scholarship and Knowledge

 

 

 

 

1

Understand international business with an emphasis on cultural diversity, adaptation, and maintaining integrity in scholarship, instruction, and practice.

X

 

 

 

2

Evaluate the implications of international dimensions and their effects on day-to-day business operations and strategy.

X

 

 

 

3

Recognize the risks and opportunities that face multinational organizations in the global arena.

X

 

 

 

 

Intellectual In. & Communication

 

 

 

 

1

Perform individual research on a question, issue, or problem and then able to relay their results to professors/classmates using appropriate exposition techniques.

 

 

 

X

2

Practice impartial evaluation of the merits and applicability of reports and/or articles in both academic and popular publications.

 

 

 

X

2

Apply theoretical concepts expressed in class to case studies and/or real life situations in their workplaces.

 

 

 

X

 

Community Building

 

 

 

 

1

Understand that multinational firms have a global responsibility of improving the the various communities within which they operate

 

 

X

 

2

Understand the benefits of working in teams composed of people from various ethnic, educational, and work experience backgrounds

 

 

X

 

 

Leadership and Service

 

 

 

 

1

Second year students will serve as mentors for one or more incoming students

 

X

 

 

2

All students alternate leadership roles in small groups thereby requiring all students to practice group leadership skills

 

X

 

 

3

Students speak with and advise undergraduate international business majors.

 

X

 

 

 

Spirituality and Values

 

 

 

 

1

Understand the social responsibility aspect of doing international business

 

X

 

 

2

Recognize the impact of their managerial choices on various environmental issues in different multinational contexts

 

X

 

 

3

Understand that moral and ethical behavior will often differ from behavior that is merely legal

 

X

 

 

 

TABLE 2 Learning Outcomes by Course , Faculty and Semester

THE EMIB program admits students in the fall semesters, the learning objectives will be assessed over a two year-period academic cycle beginning Spring 2008, according to the following calendar

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

John Loughlin

John Zhao

Nitish Singh

Ampy Kollman-Moore

 

Scholarship and Knowledge

IB 514 (Spring 2008)

 

 

 

 

Intellectual Inquiry & Communication

 

IB 543 (Spring 2009)

 

 

 

Community Building

 

 

 

IB 561 (Fall 2009)

 

Leadership and Service

 

 

IB 531 (Fall 2009)

 

 

Spirituality and Values

 

 

IB 531 (Fall 2009)